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will the u.s. play? and did the u.n. vote dom lay to stop gadhafi? will he accept some kind of deal? we'll try to answer those questions. also, japanese authorities have raised the assessment of the disaster to a five, three mile island level on a seven-point scale and now admit they're overwhelmed employing a throw it against the wall and see what sticks approach. the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission says it could take weeks to get things under control. >>> score one for the unions in wisconsin. a judge has temporarily blocked that new law blocking collective bargaining rights in that state. democrats hope this is the first of many obstacles to that law they hate. we'll check it out. >>> let me finish with libya. do we have any idea how we'll get out. we start with the growing crisis in libya. richard engel joins us from cairo. give us a sense of what's happening as the u.n. begins to take action. what is the condition of the rebel force, entirely benghazi? >> reporter: the rebel force is very weak in benghazi and across the country. what happened was the rebels advanced
in benghazi. the goal, to protect the people of libya. now a senior u.s. military official tells cnn the u.s. has launched its first air strikes in the western part of the country. those u.s. tomahawk missiles have landed in the area around tripoli and misrata. >> and this as moammar gadhafi sends letters to the u.n. and its allies warning them to stay out of his country. >> meanwhile, the leader behind the u.n. resolution gathered in paris today to map out the road ahead. french warplanes are circling over libya, enforcing that yuu. sanctioned no-fly zone. >> and they have flexed military muscle firing on a libyan military vehicle. our senior international correspondent, nic robertson, is joining us right now from tripoli. nic, there were some reports that there were loud booming noises. now perhaps we know in large part why. perhaps as a result of those u.s. tomahawk missile strikes? >> reporter: yeah. it's not possible for us to confirm it at the moment in tripoli. there certainly would be a number of targets here. the former u.s. air base east of the city here houses not only some of the
this situation and didn't necessarily think u.n. action or u.s. action was necessary or something that should happen. what was the turning point for you where you thought, okay, it's time to go? >> well, first of all, i laid out the conditions required, which were the u.n. security council resolution and arab league support. and i saw them being taken. and then i thought about what the consequences were if gadhafi was allowed to continue to use force in defiance of international opinion. and so gadhafi looks like he'll have to be dealt with anyway. but this is the slippery slope of intervention, that many of us had been warning about for some weeks is the chorus of cries out there, let's go intervene, let's go do something. once you start this, it has to be finished. it will be very hard now to admit and say to gadhafi, okay, well, you got away with it, okay, now you're the leader of libya, we'll buy your oil. so now we've got a state which is at least in appearances seems to be an outlaw state. >> general clark, stand by. i just want to reset here for our viewers as we cross the top of the h
on the ground. we'll bring you more when we have it. >> kelly: all right. meantime the u.s. and its allies are moving in to try and end the violence against civilians in libya. president obama describing the effort today during his trip to brazil. >> and people of libya must be protected and in the absence of the immediate end to violence against civilians, our coalition is prepared to act and act with urgency. >> kelly: joining us now doug schoen, and gentlemen, thank you for joining us today. >> thank you. >> kelly: it's a fluid situation as you heard secretary of the state clinton talk about. the president, while he's talking about it still has not defined what the strategic objective in libya, other than he wants gaddafi to be held accountable and out. so is he making that case very clear? >> i don't think he is, kelly. i think it's a positive development that the president has said that we will support the coalition efforts and the french efforts to oust president gaddafi or colonel gaddafi. i think it's positive that he's enforcing the no-fly zone and reports the international effort
urgeent. u.s. and allied forces firing on libya igniting the biggest international military effort since the iraq war. this is a special edition of the fox report. new images showing u.s. navy ships firing missiles at qaddafi air defenses and teeping up with britain,itiny and canada all to support a rebel uprising in that country. it appears on the verge of defeat. secretary of state hillary clinton said left unchecked qaddafi will commit unspeakable atrocities . the first shots coming from french fighter jets. a plane shot down over the outskirts of benghazi bursting in flames . crashed and sending thick black smoke in the sky. rebels, cheering and celebrating as international forces move in tryying to protect them. so far 112 cruz missiles launched near tripoli. we have fox news team coverage on the ground . mike emanuel is traveling with the president in brazil and steve first in tripoli. steve, any reaction from qaddafi to the air trikes? >>reporter: john, what we heard from qaddafi in the past several days. one of defiance and he said he will retaliate against military or civilian t
>>> this is a fox news alert. we are tracking the action in libya, we're told the u.s. will launch missile strikes against libyan air defenses within the hour. french jets launching air strikes on libyan tanks and now nato members preparing jets to head to libya to protect citizens of the north african country. they are wrapping up an emergency meeting in paris a short time ago as french warplanes circle the skies enforce the no-fly zone. hello, welcome to a brand-new hour. >> jamie: i'm jamie colby. the situation in libya is quickly developing as nato counties shift military resources to the region. molly henneberg is tracking that and live in the d.c. bureau. molly, good to see you. secretary clinton it's so unusual to hear from how severe things they are. should she did have a couple diplomatic points she wanted to make very clear clear. tell us about those. >> molly: that the u.s. backed international efforts to prevent libyan leader from muammar khadafy from attacking his own people but the u.s. would be taking a supportive role in any operation. >> we did not lead this. we di
. >> and ed henry is traveling with the u.s. president obama in south america. and in japan martin savidge is live in tokyo. >> retired general wesley clark and psychologist wendy walsh join us for analysis. >> i want to welcome our international viewers from around the world. i'm don lemon. >> and i'm jonathan mann from cnn international. let's get you caught up now on the latest news. >> we start in libya where the u.s. fired the first missiles inside libya just a short time ago. before that, french fighter jets made the first strike against moammar gadhafi's forces, destroying military vehicles. the international community is enforcing the u.n.'s no-fly zone over libya, pressuring gadhafi to stop killing his own people. we'll have a live report from tripoli in just a few minutes. >>> president obama, meantime, weighing in on the libya situation in brazil, the first day of his five-day trip. the president emphasized this is an international operation, the u.s. only playing its part along with a number of others. he also said the use of force was not the first choice but the international
-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> u.s. missiles light the mediterranean sky and operation "odyssey dawn" is now under way. a coalition of western arab states launched the first strikes on libya. >>> french warplanes lead the assault. the allies' goal to stop moammar gadhafi from butchering his own people to stay in power. >> at this hour, some of the besieged towns including in benghazi in ruins but it's still in the hands of rebels. benghazi is right now, after days of pleading for help, they're finally getting it. the international community is responding right now with decisive effects. we want to welcome our viewers to this special edition of "the situation room." i'm wolf blitzer in washington. >> and i'm jonathan mann in atlanta. we welcome you to our continuing coverage of "target libya." it's been an extraordinary 48 hours. thursday afternoon, we saw the u.n. security council authorize the establishment of a no-fly zone over libya. and in just the last few hours, we have seen the first flights to bring that to the air. now, eight years to the day after u.s. militar
at from the u.s. navy. i'm don lemon from the cnn headquarters in atlanta. >> i'm jonathan mann. a special edition of "the situation room" with wolf blitzer is next. >>> thanks very much. french jets take off. the allied gauntlet comes down. a coalition of western and arab states launching the first strikes on libya. >> yoins in firing missiles against gadhafi's forces around misrata, to stop gadhafi from butchering his own people. >>> at this hour the besieged town of benghazi is in tatters we're told but still in the control of the rebels. after days of pleading for help they're getting it right now. the international community responding with decisive force. >>> hello to our viewers in the united states and around the world. we want to welcome you to a special edition of "the situation room." i'm wolf blitzer in washington and joined by jonathan mann in atlanta. jon, this is going to be a very ferocious fight given everything we know about moammar gadhafi, his sons, those most loyal to him. they are not going to give up really quickly. >> nearly 25 years after the u.s. attacked moammar
intervention in libya diplomatic preure is growing. the u.s., britain and france warned gaddafi to hold the advance and pull back on other cities. this comes on the heels of a decision to propose a no-fly zone. gaddafi has declared a cease- fire but rebels say government forces continued their assault. >> for these rebels the no-fly zone cannot come soon enough. the resolution gives me new hope. >> there for libya has decided on an immediate cease-fire and stoppage of all operations. >> that announcement has been received with skepticism. >> the libyan people have called for international assistance. this resolution paves the way for that to be answered. colonel gaddafi's refusal to hear the repeated calls to stop violence against his own people has left us with no other choice. >> the international community will not be tricked by the libyan regime. the international community will verify strict compliance with the resolution. >> at the nato headquarters preparations were made to pave the way for operations to begin this weekend. >> we now havthe power and legal basis to stop. that is
developing situation out of libya. >> heather: the u.s. navy has three submarines for operations against libya but france fired the opening shots and military intervention. protests continuing around libya despite muammar khadafy refuting reports that he is firing on his own people. he says she prepared to die for his country. >> gregg: steve harrigan is streaming live. what is the latest there? >> a lot of nervous gunfire on the ground on the capitol coming from the ground, small arms fire as well as anti-aircraft fire. we are not sure what they are exactly shooting here. reports of cruise fires, state television in libya saying they have hit the capitol of tripoli but i'm standing here we would hear a cruise missile. it has not hit air defense systems here yet. it's clear that french warplanes are in the fight around the city of benghazi. 20 french jets enforcing the no-fly zone. they have engaged one libyan military vehicle and they destroyed four government tanks, unfirmed reports. people are fleeing to the east as fast as they can. khadafy government forces are inside the city with
, showing tomahawk missiles being fired from a u.s. ship, the u.s. and our allies launching airstrikes against the qaddafi regime earlier today hoping to prevent further attacks by libyan forces on rebels and other civilians, and, welcome to a brand new hour of america's news headquarters. >> jamie: i'm jimmamie colby. the french fighter jets are enforcing the no-fly zone over the north african nation and the rebel fighters are battling forces loyal to muammar qaddafi in the city of benghazi. steve harrigan is streaming live from the capital of tripoli where there is a lot of activity as well, steve, tell us the latest. >> reporter: right now we're hearing the steady pounding of anti-aircraft fire off my right, in the distance. it's not clear whether they are firing at actually planes, or just in anticipation of attack. i can tell you about the cruise missiles. we have not heard any here in the center of tripoli, two miles away from colonel qaddafi's headquarters. muammar qaddafi has responded to those cruise missile attacks in a rather unusual address on state television. he was not s
on libya will put the civilians at risk and the u.s. will support national military efforts to prevent gaddafi from attacking his own people. >> america has unique capabilities and we will bring them to bear to help our european and canadian allies and arab partners without further violence against civilians. including through the effective implementation of a no-fly zone. as president obama says, the united states will not deploy ground troops. but there should be no mistaking our commitment to this effort. >> reporter: secretary clinton is at an emergency summit. 22 european, north american and leaders and diplomates to get everyone on the same page how to enforce the united nations resolution authorizing a no ply zone. the secretary, had who side meetings with the foreign ministers of jordan, united arab emirates and qatar. and it's been crucial in this. kelly. >> kelly: molly, so far the french have taken the most visible lead today. diplomatically and militarily, tell us what they're doing. >> yeah, french president nicolas sarkozy hosted that meeting at the palace in paris and i
. the u.s. fired more than 100 cruise missiles into libya today as french fighter jets targeted the that the postal -- khaddafi 's fighters from above. >> u.s. officials say this will not be a ground war. u.s. troops will not be on the ground in libya. so far, 110 vessels have been lost from the sea into libyan territory targeting communication sites, air defense sites, to make it safe enough for aircraft to find -- to flat over libya to enforce a no-fly zone. -- to fly over libya to enforce a no-fly zone. khaddafi officials are calling this a brutal assault. they are sticking by a cease- fire. on the ground today, there was no cease-fire. khaddafi pulse of course this but asked about the pulse el -- cannot pay -- >> president obama has promised u.s. ground forces will not enter libya. his decision has upset some lawmakers. obama said the u.s. and its allies had no toys but to act. brian moore has the story from washington. >> bomar gaddafi -- khaddafi defied orders. >> over 110 tomahawk cruise missiles fired from u.s. and british ships struck more than 20 integrated air defense
the u.s. will now lead military action to stop gadhafi's brutal crackdown. and in japan, the nuclear crisis goes up a notch, increased to a higher alert level. what will it take to cool down those reactors and prevent a nuclear meltdown. our teams are on the ground across the world and "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> a special good evening to our viewer in the west tonight. tonight we have to take you on something of a tour of the world to cover the overwhelming amount of news going on. and while we have been focused on the disaster in japan, where the nuclear alert level actually went up a notch today, while it's been going on for exactly a week tonight, instead we must begin tonight back in libya. today president obama announced that on top of the twor wars we're fighting, the u.s. will now take the lead on possible military action in libya. the u.n. approved it last night. it started out as a no-fly zone but has grown into something perhaps bigger. a nato ultimatum of gadhafi of libya that the president says is non-negotiable. gadhafi d
the next day and then you're not putting up any forces, you're criticizing the u.s. for foreign military intervention. so they want to make sure the arabs are along with them so then they can't be blamed later on. so that's -- >> finish your point there. >> so that's why we've been seeing secretary clinton really in the last week reaching out to those arab leaders saying, we need you with us. you say you're going to -- you say you support this, you say you want us to influence the no-fly zone, what are you going to do to stand with us to do this? this is really extraordinary. an arab league authorizing force against one of its members. as we've said, it's really a unique since the gulf war in 1991. >> unique in many ways, but no matter what, will there still be some elements in the arab world who will see this as still being operated, still being controlled behind the scenes at least in large part by western powers, appearing once again to be exerting some kind of military action in another arab country? >> well, we've seen -- that's why this is really unique. because nobody has
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mars and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to ma
, the u.s., the french, the arabs will all move in. >> let me be clear. these terms are not negotiable. >>> inside hell. for the first time, hear from the workers trapped inside those nuclear reactors when the earthquake hit. and tonight, the head of that plant breaks down in front of the cameras. >>> prince william speaking out and sharing what his grandmother told him about getting through the tough times. >>> and, everyday hero. how one man took one failing school and changed the future of all these kids in just five words. he's our "person of the week." >>> good evening. for one week now, we have been focused on the dangerous unknowns of the nuclear crisis in japan. but tonight, we begin with the unpredictable and dangerous mind of moammar gadhafi. today, president obama told americans that u.s. forces may be called into military action once again, this time, against gadhafi. joining other countries trying to keep the dictator from savaging his own people. tonight, we set out to answer three big questions. will other countries like england, france, arab nations really take the lead
he won't have that. >> in a statement to reporters he said u.s. forces won't land in libya and sources tell fox news, attack planes will not be used in the no-fly zone. operation requires american leadership but not that we act alone. >> this is precisely how the international community should work as more nations bear responsibility and the costs of enforcing international law. >> reporter: that should mean a smaller chair of costs that could range from a few million to a hundred million a week. there are reports his advisors were deeply divided over the prospect of military action but he has resisted gig up. he didn't want the u.s. to be the issue in another arab conflict. there were quiet rumbles from 18 men's of congress he briefed but statement to reporters later was aimed at winning over skeptical americans. >> here is why this matter -- left uncheck that khadafy would commit atrocities against his people, many thousands could die. humanitarian crisis would ensue. >> reporter: in language that recalled his predecessor, he also said the word of the international commun
still at war in iraq and afghanistan. the u.s. has now joined a third battlefront, firing missiles into another nation, libya. a coalition of 21 countries trying to stop moammar gadhafi from waging war on his own people. before the ataturk there were images of a plane brought down, not sure how, as gadhafi forces continue to defend the rebel stronghold. what is at risk for the united states tonight and what happens next? our team has been reporting on the big events all day, and we'll begin with martha raddatz in washington. >> we're getting the first pictures of one of the tomahawk missiles being launched from a u.s. ship. there's no question we're at war once again and the u.s. for now is in the lead. the first vowlley of missiles a wither attack. more than 110 missiles launched from mostly u.s. ships and submarines, pounded the libyan missile sietsz. the missiles were fired from 500 miles away in the mediterranean sea after 2:00 p.m. eastern time, hitting libyan soil hours later. >> the targets themselves were selected on a selective assessment that decides either that pose a di
to be the targets here, but that there are ground force near the sites where the u.s. is targeting, that they could become casualties at this point. do you think, given what we do know about libya, this would be enough to motivate people to switch sides, to back off, to rethink their support of libya's strongman? >> as i said, it's really about momentum right now. if there's any sense the momentum is shifting against the gadhafi regime, we're likely to see additional defections. the only thing that reverses it is that gadhafi was still strong and he had a lot of tools as his disposal. it could happen. when you look at the u.n. resolution, everybody's been saying it's about civilians. but if you look at the text, it gives the international community and those carrying out the commission is it gives them tools. every target in libya is a legitimate target if it's tied to civilians. the mission is about defending civilians. you've already stated the u.s., the europeans, most of those who are part of the coalition really don't think they can live with gadhafi as president of libya. they see him has hav
seem to be doing their job. u.s. attorney d.c. d.c., can't have a higher investigator than that -- district of columbia, can't have a higher investigator than that. >> reporter: issa's probe caught her by surprise. >> not only did i not know about it, you would have thought as a courtesy i would have been given some notice, but the staff of the committee didn't know about it until the press release came out. >> reporter: meanwhile it appears sulaimon brown is fully cooperating with the agencies investigating his allegations. this morning he was called to the fbi again. did they ask you to bring anything? >> can't comment. >> reporter: did you bring anything? >> can't comment on that either. >> reporter: we also caught up with mayor gray at a ceremony to recognize d.c.'s use of green energy, but he didn't want to talk about the controversy. >> i want to stay on this, okay? i talked about the house last night. i want to stay on this. this is a good news story and i want to stay with that. thank you. >> reporter: congresswoman norton says she spoke to chairman issa today by ph
as a u.s. operation. so there really was a need from their point of view to build up enough international political support so that the united states could say -- stay if not in the background, at least sort of on the sidelines. >> and the president in his press conference, i thought it was striking to list the things that we're not going to do. we're not going to deploy ground troops. we're not going to use force to go beyond a well-defined goal. what's with all this not, not, not stuff? >> there's a lot of ambiguity. he did say we're not going to employ a ground force which is prohibited by the u.n. resolution as well. he also said the goal of the operation will not go beyond protecting civilians. but at the same time, he said qaddafi has lost the legitimacy to lead. and you had secretary clinton and you had the french government also saying that the logical result of this operation will be that the qaddafi regime is overthrown. so they've certainly injected -- gwen: a logical result, but is that the goal? they've now set out a goal they have to push him out of office. they can't stop s
of the day. u.s. forces will nuteralize the aircraft of the libyans and other people are not going to commit to the ground and i fear al-gaddafi's forces are going to prevail over the long term unless we find a better way to support the resistance on the ground. >> neil: cornel. we are watching the opening statement. that is watch because i don't understand portuguese. i apologize . the other bad news, is no one understands portuguese. >> neil: i -- know. this is the longest opening statement on the part of a foreign leader in the history of man. but the president is down there and we are told hillary clinton secretary of state did brief him on these talks going on with the french president nicholas sarkozy and many are saying that hillary clinton are sounding the clarion call and leading that in the administration, what do you think of that? >> it is apparent france is taking the leading role. they demonstrated they are committed to doing something and we hope that our european alleys and alleys in the africa will end up being the ones and our egyptian friends and the ones who are providing
on during a calm day at the wind farm. heated 57 million u.s. homes. simmered grandma's chicken noodle soup. melted tons of recycled glass. roasted millions of coffee beans. provided electricity for nearly 29 million home computers. heated your bathwater. cooked your takeout. lit your way home. we helped america import less of its energy. cleared the air by burning cleaner than other fuel sources, with less pollutants and no mercury. and tomorrow, we could do even more. we're cleaner, domestic, abundant and ready now. we're america's natural gas. the smarter power today. learn more at anga.us. what are you looking at? logistics. ben? the ups guy? no, you see ben, i see logistics. logistics? think--ben is new markets. ben is global access-- china and beyond. ben is a smarter supply chain. ben is higher margins. happier customers... everybody wins. logistics. exactly. see you guys tomorrow. fresh aftershock s injapan as signs of the nuclear crisis begin to show up in the food supply. >>> in libya, a rebel plane crashes. this is the when they meet to discuss military action. is the u.s. on the
>>> target libya, the first u.s. and coalition military strikes an forces are underway. >> we cannot stand i'dly by when he tells his people there will be no mercy. >> cruise missiles attack libyan targets. the broadest military effort since the invasion of iraq began today. >> plus, disaster in japan, progress on the nuclear reactor, but concerns on food in that country. >> from nbc news orld heworld h quarters in new york, this is nbc news with lester holt. >> protecting civilians from moammar gadhafi. u.s. and british naval vessels launched 110 tomahawk vessels along libya's coast. confirming the start that president obama stressed it would not involve ground troops. why want to start in the libyan capitol with jim messeda. >> reporter: lester, what unfolded in libya today wasn't plausible days ago. late this afternoon jets took off, destination benghazi, libya. 110 cruise miz ills hitting 120 defense miz ills. later today, punched through defenses intense fighting killing many civilians. the violence too much for many who fled in their cars heading east. their hopes of get
to announce. it is very clear that the u.s., france and other western powers don't want to create the perception globally that this is strictly a western action general the arab nation. arab partners are involved. is that role a symbolic role or a more active role where you have jet fighters deployed? of course, it was the arab nations one week ago today that voted to support a no-fly zone over libya. the arab league calling for the u.n. security council to push ahead of the no-fly zone. today here in cairo, we caught up with the leader who voted in the nationwide referendum. the arab league supports the no-fly zone, but he emphasized this is not to be a military action or invasion. no one is talking about invading libya. certainly when you look at countries like france and listen to statements by french president nicolas sarkozy, the rhetoric is different. he suggests attacking targets on the ground. when you look at how the resolution is written up, it leads the possibility of attacks and targets on the ground open. it will be interesting to see how arab nations will react if th
was pretty clear about how he sees the u.s. involved in libya. the u.s. would support operations but not necessarily commit war planes to the actual enforcement of the no-fly zone. refueling planes, maybe even drones. what about ground troops? here tap president's answer to that. >> i also want to be clear about what we will not be doing. the unite is not going to deploy ground troops into libya, and we are not going to use force to go beyond a well-defined goal, specifically, the protection of civilians in libya. in the coming weeks, we will continue to-t help the libyan people so they can fulfill their aspirations peacefully. >> president obama is in brazil right now. the first stop on his three-country latin american trip. we'll take you live to brasilia for more on what he hopes to accomplish there. >>> returning to japan. a week after they got hit with that devastating earthquake and tsunami, problems seem to keep adding up. today we're hearing about abnormal abnormally high levels of radiation in spinach and milk. japan's health ministry has ordered a stop to the sale of pr
foreign policy program for the region, highly dependent on the u.s. and western support. iran is qualitatively different. they have been politically independent. and is to give you an example of how the regime despite all of its failings, up until 2009i would argue that it still had a certain degree of legitimacy. that is reflected in the fact that in 2009 we had a phenomenal event or about 80-85 percent of the electorate shows up to the ballot box to cast a vote hoping this people who voted for the opposition, the they could change the course of the public, not drastically, but change back to the performance days. the fact that people were voting in high numbers suggests that they believe the electoral system had a certain degree of legitimacy. it could shift the direction which speaks to a certain degree of legitimacy. no wonder is this now because the 2009 elections were largely stolen, but up until 2009 you did have a certain degree of legitimacy as reflected in the high voter turnout. never been in evidence anywhere in egypt or tunisia to the same extent that we have seen
. it could spark intervention from the u.s. and its allies within hours. and david kerley is with the president, who is beginning a trip to latin america, in brazil. good morning, david? >> reporter: the president is in brazil now. waiting to see if the unpredictable moammar gadhafi heeds his warning. and gadhafi may have answered in the last several hours. and that letter that you mentioned, calling the u.n. resolution invalid. and his forces continue to strike at the rebels in the east. this morning, a striking image. a libyan fighter plane, shot down by rebel forces battling moammar gadhafi. the libyan leader had reportedly been bombing the rebels inside his country, despite president obama's stark warning just 12 hours earlier. >> a cease-fire must be implemented immediately. let me be clear. these terms are not negotiable. >> reporter: within hours of that statement, gadhafi's government scrambled, saying it's declared a cease-fire. but this morning, the fighting continues. and there are new questions about if and when the united states and its allies will have to enf
by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. president obama put libya on notice today saying the u.s. and its allies are ready for military action. tom, the president's message was aimed at libyan leader moammar qaddafi. >> tom: susie, speaking at the white house, president obama said qaddafi must end the violence and pull back troops from towns under attack. >> let me be clear, these terms are not negotiable. if qaddafi does not comply, the resolution will be enforced through military action. >> susie: ahead of the president's warning, libya said it's ceasing all military action and will begin talking with opposition groups. that came after a vote at the united nations calling for a no- fly zone over the country. not surprisingly, oil markets were volatile today. crude prices closed down 35 cents to settle at $101 a barrel, off their high of $103. as suzanne pratt reports the oil market is coping with a long list of issues. >> reporter: in the past week much of the world has been fixated on japan, with one exception. the global oil market is paying much more attention to bubbling co
. the operation comes just days after the u.s., europe and the arab world announced a plan. >> our air force will oppose any action by colonel qaddafi against civilians. >> reporter: the u.s. will help protect french and other airmissions. depending upon how libyans respond, the u.s. mi launch additional attacks. secretary of state hillary clinton says that the u.s. will break unique capabilities to bare. >> we will support an international coalition as it takes all necessary measures to enforce the terms of resolution 1973. >> president obama says that the u.s. and a coalition of other countries are prepared to act with urgency to end violence against civilians in libya. >> our resolve is strong and the terms are clear. we must protect the libyan civilians. >> reporter: the u.s. navy right now has three submarines in the mediterranean. in new york, rick fullbow, fox news. >>> president obama spoke from brazil which is why you just saw a picture of him at the beginning of the story. president obama says that he did not want to take this action. in fact, that's why the u.s. are only protectin
the president not just in the u.s. but global we know what al-gaddafi has done and brutal he's been to his people. is what obama has done in the last 48 hours going to have a impact if al-gaddafi is there six months from now. most observers think that the impact that the u.s. will have will be too little and too late. >> frank, a lot of leaders are brutal to their people . i sound callous when i bring it up. former commander of the uss cole. do we get involved in every country and every leader that is brutal to his people. we would run out of countries. >> i understand that we did get involved in egypt and involved in what is going on in the middle east. why would we push out someone who is in favor of the united states and aloww machine who is not only hostile to the u.s. but killed americans, why would we actively allow him to stay. >> why would we assume who ever replaces him is better? who is to say that the rebels going after al-gaddafi now weren't among those in the vast crowds that were greeting the lockerbie bomber when he was welcomed back in libya as a hero. >> neal, i studied gl
and reports of his tanks moving to a rebel held trong hold in the west . the u.s. and allies are seeing all of this and feeding their plan to respond militarily to libya. jets landing in the air base in italy. sarkozy said his country has war planes over the air space. secretary of state expected to make comments about u.s. involvement to stop al-gaddafi and stop him now. we'll take you there live as soon as she speaks . david piper news of something else taking hold there, a food scare. david, what can you tell us? >> first of all radioactive iodine is discovered in tap water here in tokyo and five other nearby areas. the japanese authorities say it is within safety levels and a food square by the fukushima plant. they found radioactive part in milk and pin spin and banned them for sale. with all of the bad news, there is one positive development at this time in the fukushima. they got the half mile cable attached to the power plant there in the homes that with power they can cool down the troubled reactors and engineers say they have successfully attached the power cable. it is crucial. i
and we'll keep in close contact with you, nic, as we find out more about these developments. >>> u.s. president barack obama indicated friday he will not be taking the lead in enforcing this no-fly zone. there were discussions about the complications enforcing it. >> how would the imposition of this no-fly zone work, strikes have to proceed sort of securing the airspace over libya? where would they come from? >> let's take a closer look. we have to be clear about that. the united states insisted there would be certain air participation. if you imagine this circle, then you're going to impose a no-fly zone over libya, one of the first step use want to take, these are libyan air installations across the country. one of the first steps that happens in a no-fly zone is you try to take out one of the runways. you bomb it from above so that libyan planes can't take off and run. they can repair those, but that's one key step to look for in the early days. take out especially the key northern areas. tripoli over here, oil and gas places over here. take out places that gadhafi and his people
. >> there will be participation in the diplomatic effort. this is the last signal. the u.s., u.k. and france have set the conditions. after the summit, i think that we will launch the military intervention. >> reports from libya said forces loyal to colonel khadafy continue to attack rebel forces despite the cease-fire. we traveled to the east of the country. we have a report from benghazi. >> what began as a rebellion now sounds more like a war. this area has been attacked from the sea, land and air. it is a graphic illustration of why a no-fly zone is needed. over the last hour or so we have been listening to the sound of what appears to be a pretty brutal battle between the two sides. we can hear the sound of rockets and artillery landing. we believe that the front line has now edged slightly closer to benghazi. it is difficult to know what the tactics of colonel khadafy are, but they seem to be applying as much pressure as they can upon the rebels before the no-fly zone is put into action. >> it is impossible to know how many have died here. we were shown the bodies of two fighters killed here to
and offered our japanese friends whatever assistance is needed. >> the u.s. has been present in japan since 1945 when general mcarthur oversaw the occupation following world war ii. today, our military has over 35,000 troops stationed there. 15 american ships make up the u.s. relief efforts headed to the area this past week including a nuclear powered warship the uss ronald reagan. >> it is a supercarrier with capabilities like air lift which would allow cargo and people to move on and off the shift and medical facilities that equate to a full hospital onboard. other ships on their are way are stopping to singapore to unload relief supplies to get them to japan. we also have some 35,000 troops there and they could be mobilized as well. >>> survivors picking through the debris of what is left and it is as bad as anything i have seen. >> but amid the debris, some stories of hope. while soldiers were searching for victims in a badly damaged town along the northeast coast of japan they heard sounds of life. they found a 4 month old baby girl covered in mud. she mile after mile of death and dest
supply. and in libya, a rebel plane crashes. you're seeing it there. this is the u.s. and its allies. is the u.s. on the brink of another war. >> it's 10:00 a.m. right on the nose. we have new details this morning on the extext of the radiation leak. the japanese government says spinach and milk exceed safety limits for radiation. officials were quick to add that food poses no immediate health risk. japanese officials say that the radio active iodine has been detected in drinking water for tokyo and five other areas. emergency crews are trying to restore power to six reactors. officials hope to connect more of the reactors today to try to get the cooling systems back online. and more numbers on the extent of the tragedy. more than 7300 people are confirmed dead and nearly 11,000 remain missing. robert, another good day to you. what's the latest you are hearing about the contaminated milk and spinach and iodine detected in drinking water? tokyo, where you are? >> reporter: alex, i have not been able to confirm the radio active water here in tokyo. there were reports about radio active
it would be a good moment to send the signal. the u.s., the u.k., and france has allowed the cease-fire. we have said the conditions. after the summit, and the coming hours, i think we will go to lodge a the military intervention. -- launch a military intervention. >> they continue to attack rebel forces despite the ceasefire. he is now back from where he has sent this report. >> what began as a rebellion sounds more like a war. across the scrub land, attacked from the land, sea, and air. a fighter jet has been spotted. it is a graphic illustration of why a no-fly zone is needed. we have been listening to the sound of what appears to be a pretty brutal battle between the two sides. we can't go any further down this road. you can hear the sound of rockets and artillery landing. we believe the frontline is slightly closer. it is difficult to know what the tactics of the colonel hart, but they seem to be applying as much pressure as the no-fly zone is put into action. the is impossible to tell how many have died here. in a conflict that is turning ordinary men and the warriors. -- into warrior
of course immense u.s. naval air power and precision guided munitions could also be brought into the battle. >> and there is our u.s. ships that are now in the mediterranean sea. the united nations resolution clearly calls out not just for enforcement of a no fly zone but to intercept any sort of military aid that is banned by u.n. resolution that could be going into support moammar gadhafi's forces. and yet already we're seeing today a resolution that russia abstained on and so did china, russia taking a stand and saying it regrets western forces are taking this action. is that problematic for this effort in any way? >> i don't think it really is because the vote's already been taken on resolution 1973 and the russians and the chinese abstained. if they had wanted to object and put a road block up against this thing, they could have done it earlier in the week. they decided not to. this smells to me like diplomatic maneuvering that is not of great consequence. the big question for me is are they going to nick gadhafi or are they going to try to take him out? you know, we still don't really
the pentagon is going to send 450 specialists to the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant and the u.s. admiral, who would be in charge of the operation, he believes that a joint u.s.-japanese operation could prevent a meltdown. natalie? >> of course, people around the affected area have been evacuated but we have even seen people leaving japan from tokyo and elsewhere, just afraid of what this could mean to their health. what is the latest news from the government and as far as trying to get to remain the peace and calm among people there in japan through all of this? >> reporter: natalie, i've got to say that people here in tokyo are relatively calm. we are, of course, some 250 kilometers from the power plant. so those who are living around the plant, it is a different situation. there is an exclusion zone that has been set up. some 20 kilometers from the plant. we spoke to a number of people who were able to flee that area. they were taking refuge in a shelter. there have been many shelters set up around the country, but this one particular shelter, they are offering food, bedding and, you k
and reconnaissance platforms from u.s. military or some of our partner element or some intelligence agencies but it is afghan forces doing knock on the door, going over the wall and conducting the actual operation with some assistance as i said in relatively small numbers, typically. >> let me ask you about pakistan. in your testimony, you, i think, appropriately acknowledged the great efforts the pakistanis have made in recent years against the taliban and tragic floods. i also was struck and i was glad to hear your tone of guarded hopefulness about what they might do next in dealing with the sanctuaries, the key part turnovers afghan insurgency and i found myself hoping you were right but wonder if you worry about the counterargument which would be if the afghans kept these sanctuaries operational for their own reasons which they may not have backed away from and they may not think we're going to get the job done well enough and they need a backup plan or perhaps they are in a more aggressive way trying to exert some leverage over president karzai in trying to have a hand in any negotiatio
>>> two big stories developing at this hour in libya. more fighting overnight as the u.s. and its allies meet on whether to take military action. it could happen as soon as today. >>> in japan, more fallout from the growing disaster. now there's a new threat to those who live near the nuclear reactors. we will have a live report. good morning, everyone. i'm alex witt. dramatic twists on the ground in libya and the threat of international military action. it is rapidliesque lating. this morning, shelling has been reported at the rebel stronghold of benghazi despite a cease fire gadhafi ordered on friday. renls say they shot down a pro-gadhafi fighter jet. in paris, a crisis meeting will begin shortly to detail what kind of military action the international community may take. action could begin within hours of this meeting. we have a live report from the region. >>> we have big news from japan this morning. workers are making progress as they frant ickically attempt to rebuild power lines to the reactors and hope to re-establish power at the fukushima daiichi sometime today but eve
and i offered our japanese friend whatever assistance is needed. >> the u.s. has been present in japan since 1945 when general mcarthur oversaw the occupation following world war ii. today our military has over 35,000 troops stationed there. 15 american ships makeup the relief efforts headed to the area this past week, including a nuclear-powered warship, uss ronald reagan. it's a super carrier with all kinds of capabilities like air lift allowing cargo to move on and off the ship and a medical facility equating to a full hospital on board. other ships are stopping in sports like singapore to get them to the people of japan wex have some 38,000 troops on the ground there. they can be mobilized as well. >> picking through the dead is an apalling situation, bad as anything i've seen. >> but there are stories of hope. while solders were searching for victims in a badly damaged town along the northeast coast of japan they heard sounds of life. they found a 4-month-old baby girl covered in mud, cold and wet but otherwise fine. rescuers were able to lok indicate the father who was then reuni
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